What I Do

Clearing the Way

The first step in coaching is to get clear about your true priorities in life and at work. Then we review your commitments to determine if you are spending time on what really matters to you. If there is a gap, we come up with a plan that supports you in renegotiating or even breaking commitments that are no longer serving your priorities. New commitments create new anchors, and most clients report they feel better about their choices.

Sometimes, even when priorities are clear, people feel stuck in their present situation and unable to make changes. Coaching helps you explore the hidden narrative that keeps you locked in place and then change it, so you can move forward.

Photo of Alison Carroll with client

I focus on three general areas in my coaching practice:

LIFE AT WORK

Many people approach work as if it were a battlefield. We explore ways to unwind the old tapes that drive that narrative and dig deeper into how work can bring fulfillment and even joy. You will learn how to work in new ways, with less emotional drama, more satisfaction and a greater sense of purpose.

VETERANS IN 
TRANSITION

Since 2013, I've worked with dozens of men and women leaders transitioning from the military to civilian sphere. Service people face a unique set of challenges, and we partner together in a focused, efficient and results-oriented way as we work through the professional and personal side of change.

SMALL BUSINESSES

All organizations are networks of relationships, conversations and commitments. Whether you are a founder or work in a small business, learning to navigate these networks more skillfully will foster new perspectives and empower you to take actions that lay the groundwork for success.

my two cents

Photo of computer on desk

How to Take Charge of Overwhelm

I heard a woman at a book group say recently: “I don’t want to lean in; I just want to lie down.” Sometimes I feel the same way. After I posted an essay about our culture of overwork and the epidemic of overwhelm, I saw a Petula Dvorak column in the Washington Post called Welcome…

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Photo of Coffee Mug and sign that says "Draw The Line"

Deprogramming from the Cult of Overwork

How many hours a week do you spend at work? More than 50? More than 70? You’re not alone. A recent Harvard Business School Survey found that 94 percent of professionals will work more than 50 hours per week, with roughly half of those people working more than 65 hours. And most of those days…

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